Roe v Wade

Richard Nixon

Definition and Summary of Roe v Wade
Summary and Definition: Until 1973, in keeping with the constitution, the right to regulate abortion was reserved to the states. This changed with the 1973 Supreme Court landmark decision in the case of Roe v Wade which ruled that state governments could not regulate abortion during the first three months until the end of the first trimester of pregnancy. This period of time that was interpreted as being within a woman’s constitutional right to privacy and protected by the Fourteenth Amendment (as recognized in 1965 Griswold v. Connecticut). The case of Roe v Wade was first argued on December 13, 1971 but, following a writ of certiorari, was re-argued in the Supreme Court on January 22, 1973 and reached a 7–2 decision in favor of the plaintiff (Roe).

Roe v Wade
Richard Nixon
was the 37th American President who served in office from January 20, 1969 to August 9, 1974. One of the important events during his presidency was the Roe v Wade legal case.

   
  

Fast Roe v Wade Facts for kids
The Petitioner in the case was 'Jane Roe' who later identified herself as Norma McCorvey. The defendant was Henry Wade, the Dallas, Texas district attorney.  The cased was first argued on Monday, December 13, 1971 by Texas attorney Sarah Weddington against defender, Jay Floyd. Sarah Weddington reargued the case at the Supreme Court on Wednesday, October 11, 1972 against defender Robert C. Flowers. The Chief Justice was Warren E. Burger who announced the Roe v Wade decision on Monday, January 22, 1973.

Roe v Wade Facts for kids: Roe v Wade Summary
The summary of the Roe v Wade summary of the decision is as follows:

Roe v Wade Summary

Roe v Wade Summary: The U.S. Supreme Court declared all the individual state bans on abortion during the first trimester to be unconstitutional.

Roe v Wade Summary: The ruling allowed states to regulate, but not to ban, abortion during the second trimester (a trimester is a period of three months during pregnancy

Roe v Wade Summary: It allowed states to ban abortion during the third trimester, unless abortion is in the best interest of the woman's physical or mental health.

Roe v Wade Summary: The Supreme Court legalized abortion in all trimesters when a woman's doctor believes the abortion is necessary for her physical or mental health

Roe v Wade Summary: The court also held that only a "compelling state interest" justified regulations limiting the individual right to privacy.

Roe v Wade Summary

Roe v Wade Facts for kids: Roe v Wade Decision
The reasoning behind the Roe v. Wade ruling was largely vested in the Fourteenth Amendment, specifically the Due Process Clause, and argued that a woman had a constitutional right to privacy.

Roe v Wade Facts for kids: Timeline and Events prior to Roe v Wade
The following fact sheet contains interesting facts and information on the events in US law and history the led up to the Roe v Wade case with a timeline of US Abortion Laws.

Roe v Wade Facts for kids - Timeline of Abortion Laws

Roe v Wade Facts - 1: During the 1800's abortion was permitted in the early stages of pregnancy. Abortions were unregulated and led to the deaths of many women. The earliest anti-abortion laws were passed in the  early 1800s, when states adopted statutory law.

Roe v Wade Facts - 2: The early anti-abortion laws were intended to protect women from untrained abortionists. The first statutory abortion regulation was passed in 1821 in Connecticut. The purpose of the law was to protect women from the inducement of abortion through the administration of poison after the fourth month of pregnancy.

Roe v Wade Facts - 3: The anti-abortion movement saw a rise in 1856 when Dr. Horatio Storer, a leading pro-life advocate established a national drive by the American Medical Association (AMA) to end legal abortion.

Roe v Wade Facts - 4: The 1873 Comstock Act was a federal law passed by Congress that made the publication and possession of information about or devices or medications used for “unlawful” abortion or contraception. Individuals convicted of violating the law were subject to up to five years of imprisonment with hard labor and a heavy fine.

Roe v Wade Facts - 5: By 1890 abortion was regulated by statutes advocated by the American Medical Association (AMA), and abortion was permitted on the word of one or more physicians who believed that the procedure was necessary to preserve the life of the mother. In any other cases, women who chose to have an abortion faced criminal prosecution.

Roe v Wade Facts - 6: In 1959 the American Law Institute (ALI) drafted a model state abortion law to make legal abortions accessible.

Roe v Wade Facts - 7: The 1965 Griswold v Connecticut was a landmark case in which the Supreme Court ruled that it was a woman’s constitutional right to privacy and protected by the 14th Amendment.

Roe v Wade Facts - 8: By 1967 abortion was classified as a felony in 49 states and Washington D.C. and one of the major goals of women's rights activists and Feminists was the repeal of laws against abortion.

Roe v Wade Facts - 9: In 1967 President John F. Kennedy created the Presidential Commission on the Status of Women (PCSW) to advise on issues concerning the status of women. 

Roe v Wade Facts - 10: In 1968 President Lyndon B. Johnson’s Committee on The Status of Women (PCSW)  released a report calling for a repeal of all abortion laws.

Roe v Wade Facts - 11: Between 1967 and 1972 California, Colorado, North Carolina, Georgia , Maryland, Arkansas, Delaware, Kansas, New Mexico, Oregon, Hawaii, New York, Alaska, Washington, Arkansas, Delaware, Kansas, New Mexico, Oregon, South Carolina, Virginia and Florida reformed their abortion laws that banned abortion except to save a woman’s life, allowing abortion on demand up to the 24th week of pregnancy. The remaining states allow abortion only to save the mother’s life.

Roe v Wade Facts - 12: On April 21, 1971 the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on its first abortion rights case in United States v. Vuitch. Dr. Milan Vuitch, a qualified physician and an abortion provider in the District of Columbia, was charged with violating a law that only allowed abortions to preserve a woman's life or health.

Roe v Wade Facts - 13: The Supreme Court ruling, in United States v. Vuitch, was that "health" should include psychological as well as physical well-being and that the burden of proof should be on the prosecutor.

Roe v Wade Facts - 14: The justices voted to hear other abortion cases, such as Roe v. Wade and Doe v. Bolton, the day after Dr. Vuitch's opinion was heard.

Roe v Wade Facts for kids - Timeline of Abortion Laws

Roe v Wade Facts for kids
The following Roe v Wade fact sheet contains interesting facts and information about the Roe v Wade case.

Facts about Roe v Wade for kids
The following Roe v Wade fact sheet contains information about the 1973 Roe v Wade legal case.

Roe v Wade Facts for kids

Roe v Wade Facts - 1: The Roe v Wade legal case was based around an unmarried, pregnant woman named Roe, a resident of Texas who brought a class action suit challenging the constitutionality of the Texas abortion laws.

Roe v Wade Facts - 2: The unmarried pregnant woman of the Roe v Wade case was identified only as 'Jane Roe' in order to maintain her anonymity. The woman concerned has since publicly identified herself as Norma McCorvey.

Roe v Wade Facts - 3: In late 1969, at the age of 21 years old , Norma McCorvey became pregnant for a third time. She was working in low-paying jobs, depressed and living with her father. She failed to obtain an abortion, and was referred to the attorneys Linda Coffey and Sarah Weddington.

Roe v Wade Facts - 4: The Roe v Wade began in March 1970 when Sarah Weddington, and her co-counsel Linda Coffey, filed suit against Henry Wade, the Dallas, Texas district attorney and the person responsible for enforcing the anti-abortion statute.

Roe v Wade Facts - 5: Sarah Weddington and Linda Coffee mounted a 1970 constitutional challenge to the Texas criminal abortion statutes that prohibited doctors from performing abortions.

Roe v Wade Facts - 6: The Roe v Wade law suit sought to have the Texas abortion law declared unconstitutional as an invasion of her right to privacy as guaranteed by the 1st, 4th, 5th, 9th Amendments and in the 14th Amendments, as recognized in 1965 Griswold v. Connecticut

Roe v Wade Facts - 7: Sarah Weddington also sought to have an Injunction, or court order, restraining the defendant (Wade) from enforcing the statutes.

Roe v Wade Facts - 8: The case of Roe v Wade was first argued on December 13, 1971 and the district court agreed that the Texas abortion laws were unconstitutional. However the state appealed against the decision, and the case was eventually reargued in the Supreme Court.

Roe v Wade Facts - 9: A physician, James Hubert Hallford, who was being prosecuted under the statute for two abortions he had performed, also filed suit against the law.

Roe v Wade Facts - 10: The three-judge district court combined the cases of Roe (McCorvey) and Hallford and the case was reargued in the Supreme Court on January 22, 1973.

Roe v Wade Facts - 11: Roe v Wade case took three years of trials to reach the Supreme Court, during which time, Norma McCorvey gave birth to the baby in question, who was eventually adopted.

Roe v Wade Facts - 12: In Roe v Wade the Supreme Court declared individual state bans on abortion during the first trimester as unconstitutional. It allowed states to regulate, but not to ban, abortion during the second trimester. It allowed states to ban abortion in all trimesters, unless abortion was in the best interest of the woman's physical or mental health.

Roe v Wade Facts - 13: Another Supreme Court's decision on the case of Doe v. Bolton was released on January 22, 1973, the same day as the decision on Roe v Wade. The case of Doe v. Bolton, was a decision of the US Supreme Court overturning the more liberal abortion law of Georgia.

Roe v Wade Facts - 14: Together, the decisions of Roe v Wade and Doe v. Bolton overturned many of the states existing abortion laws. However, the decision brought about a furor from anti-abortionist campaigners and gave rise to the United States pro-life movement (also known as the United States anti-abortion movement or the United States right-to-life movement)

Roe v Wade Facts - 15: The other side of the abortion debate in the United States is the pro-choice movement, which argues that pregnant women retain the right to choose whether or not to have an abortion.

Roe v Wade Facts - 16: The two sides of the debate continue their arguments to the present day.

Roe v Wade Facts for kids

Roe v Wade - President Richard Nixon Video
The article on Roe v Wade provides detailed facts and a summary of one of the important events during his presidential term in office. The following Richard Nixon video will give you additional important facts from
January 20, 1969 to August 9, 1974.

Roe v Wade

● Interesting Facts about Roe v Wade for kids and schools
● Summary of Roe v Wade in US history
● Facts about Roe v Wade
● Richard Nixon Presidency from January 20, 1969 to August 9, 1974
● Fast, fun, Roe v Wade about major events in his presidency
● Decision and Summary of Roe v Wade
● Roe v Wade for schools, homework, kids and children

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